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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 3, 2012 7:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy

>He proposed to reconcile the seemingly contradictory points of view by proposing a world in which consumers use piracy or free services like Spotify to sample music, then buy high-quality files of music they value.

Which is basically what the GD does. Except that you can "sample" a gazillion whole shows, and then somehow end up buying high-quality versions after all. Not every listener, and not every show, but enough to keep them raking in the $$$ some 17 years after their demise.

Hmmmm, Neil Young isn't on the archives ...

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Poster: rastamon Date: Feb 4, 2012 9:02am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy


"Hmmmm, Neil Young isn't on the archives ..."

Good point! He is at LL, bt.etree & dime though. Perhaps he's not at the Archive because of his dislike of anything but analog

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Feb 4, 2012 5:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy

Unfortunately, if you read the comments, I think they're right that there are just too many of us ignoramuses who can't tell the difference from the high-quality audio and all the other sources, and "just want to hear the song."

Then again, some of us ignoramuses will still buy the recordings, but it's more because we're sheep following the crowd, than out of true appreciation. But of course, that works in marketing too ...

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Feb 4, 2012 6:49pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy

Computers (hardware) were never designed or engineered for high-fidelity music playback, some exceptions have recently become available on the consumer market. To differentiate the sonic qualities of various recordings and digital file storage methodology requires a high-resolution music playback system.

The limitation of computers and I-pods are the cheap little headphone amplifiers and digital to analog convertors integrated into the chassis with all the other circuitry that generates noise. Further, many people listen through low fidelity earbuds or plastic desktop PC speakers.

If you were fortunate enough to have experienced the Grateful Dead live you have a basis, an audible point of reference for how the music sounded when it was performed. From the “Wall the of Sound” up through and including the great touring sound systems from 1989 - 1993, you have experience with some of the all-time greatest hi-fi systems ever designed.

You’d have to spend “hundreds of thousands” of dollars for a home audio system to get close to this live concert sound, but you’d still lack the overall dynamics and scale of the live experience.

Cost effective methods are available today to bypass the crappy computer audio circuitry, deliver and process the digital signal directly out of the PC via the USB output and I-pod docking stations.

These cost-effective (many under $1,000 solutions) desktop high-fidelity headphone amplifiers that integrate both better quality amplifiers and digital to analog convertors to drive any number of high quality headphones, or quality compact desktop active monitor speakers that integrate the amplifier and digital convertor circuitry inside the speaker enclosure to provide a more lifelike musical experience.

If you chose to pursue an upgrade, i think that you would be amazed at the improvement in the musicality of the performances, and now higher resolution music files will begin to make more sense.

If you truly love the music, the closer you get, the better the experience.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 4, 2012 12:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy

Hey Rose--not wanting to "call you out", BUT I suppose it's safe to say the CREAM didn't really "take", eh? Don't worry--that's the way it's been EVERY time (ie, I "fail" to produce a "convert" willing to invest in them, or whatever...).

Here's why I mention it: the success rate for "turning" someone to CREAM is ~ 0; for the DEAD, for me, over the yrs, I would say runs about 2-5% (at best).

But, you get the idea; me doing my thing for the DEAD over the years may have actually produced paying customers (I am sure it did for ~ 15-20 individuals, but that's > 35 yrs "work" on my part).

Not so with CREAM.

;(

Still hope you at least enjoyed some of Jack's amazing bass work...

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 5, 2012 8:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy

Oh, I think it's cool -- although of course it's not the Dead :-) It's also heavier, a la Hendrix, so it's probably not something I'd listen to a ton on a daily basis ... gotta be in the mood for it. Which is actually interesting to me; 60s GD is pretty "heavy," and yet I DO listen to it a lot. So, what's the difference? My guess is that a big part of it just comes down to Jerry, but I'm not sure I can pinpoint yet what I mean by that.

On "conversion rates": I think part of what always pulled people into the GD at the start was the whole community aspect. Of course that's no longer there per se, but then that spawned the jam band scene, so I think younger folks come in from Phish etc. So with the GD, the music has incredible staying power -- it's certainly proven that -- but I think we're kidding ourselves if we think the initial draw is 100 percent the music. I think that's a "co-draw" (in various mixes, depending on the person), and the proportion of the mix changes over the years. If that makes sense.

Other bands just don't have that community aspect/implications/perceptions, so I'm not surprised if "conversion rates" to extreme enthusiasm a la GD (as opposed to "yeah, this is cool music") would be real low. Honestly, if Hendrix wasn't HENDRIX and associated with being Mr. Sixties Purple Haze, would people listen? (And do people listen to Hendrix as much as the GD? Hmmm. Depends on what is meant by "as much." MORE people know Hendrix and have, like, an album; but in terms of enthusiasm and amount of daily listening? Well, of course there's not as much, but even then ........)


This post was modified by AltheaRose on 2012-02-06 04:11:07

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 5, 2012 8:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy


"Other bands just don't have that community aspect/implications/perceptions" - lots of communities out there. just gotta poke around...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAC5vJxlPqQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JpBqOG2Rp8

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 5, 2012 9:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy

I'm sure that's true -- heck, punk was (is?) a community too -- and I'd bet that helps the "conversion rates." Goth, emo, whatever ... all of that is niche, and hence there's a big element of community belonging/identification. But in terms of a band with as long a history as the GD, I don't think there's any that's as closely associated with the idea (and mythos) of community, and that continues to be associated with it (even 17 years after the band's demise!), and also has the catalogue of music to keep that alive in many ways (and to keep that associated with the band itself. I mean, there may be a community around Wilco, but your average person DOES know what a "Deadhead" is, complete with stereotypes, and yet would not have heard of Wilco.)

And if you went back to when WT was in his heaviest conversion phase (70s, I'd guess), the GD really did have a very specific "community vibe" that I do think was at least a partial initial entry point. That's not to say people "came for the party and stayed for the music," cuz it's not nearly that simple, but there was an element of that. And that's gotta help "conversion rates"!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 6, 2012 5:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Neil Young Defends Both Record Companies and Piracy

Yes, I think you summed it all up nicely and also, yea, I see what you mean about CREAM, Jimi, etc. Somehow I went from 68 DEAD, The Eleven, to Spoonful/NSU, and it just works easily, but a steady diet is tough...